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819 - Cultural Landscapes on Amazon Archaeological Sites

16.07.2012 | 17:30 - 19:30
17.07.2012 | 17:30 - 19:30

Convener 1: Magalhaes, Marcos (Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi , Belem, Brazil / Brasilien)
Convener 2: Guapindaia, Vera (Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi, Belem, Brazil / Brasilien)

A cultural landscape is a constructed place where the environment was reshaped becoming an artifact, like ceramics and lithics materials, bringing to us cultural aspects related with ancient indigenous societies. The way that those societies changed the environment, choosing specific places for settlements, modifying the topography, the soil, managing and cultivating tropical seeds, can indicate how technical abilities were capable to increase the acquisition of food and to maintain a large population. The results of those practices have brought to archaeologists some paths to identify archaeological sites. The soil has become black (known as Amazonian Dark Earth); a certain sort of trees next to the site are related with food supply, hunt or to provide woods; and caves were utilized as settlements or as special places to play ceremonies. The symposium has the aim to show three different archaeological sites located at the Brazilian Amazon rainforest, providing discuss about the importance that environment has to interpret old indigenous traditions.

Keywords: Amazon, Landscapes, Ceramics, Chronology.

819 - Cultural Landscapes on Amazon Archaeological Sites

Cultural landscapes are places where the environment was reshaped by human action with aspects reflecting the ancient societies that built them. The way the environment was modified by a society through the choice of specific places for settlements, the construction of habitations, waste disposal, and the management and cultivation of plants can indicate how technical abilities were capable of increasing the acquisition of food making it possible to maintain larger populations. The results of those practices give archaeologists alternative pathways to identify archaeological sites. Soils are often transformed or created such as terra preta (Amazonian Dark Earth); vegetational compositions are modified on or near sites that may correspond with the food supply, hunting, or timber production; and caves were utilized as settlements or as ceremonial locations. The symposium focuses on four areas of the Brazilian Amazon (Trombetas River, Carajás Mountains, Upper Xingu, Central Amazon) discussing the importance of environment for understanding the ancient indigenous past.

Keywords: Amazon, Landscapes, Ceramics, Chronology.

Author: Magalhaes, Marcos (Researcher, Brazil / Brasilien)
Co-Author: Guapindaia, Vera (Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi, Belem, Brazil / Brasilien)

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