Logo

12026 - THE HEROES, THE VILLANOS AND THE OTHERS: REFLECTIONS ON THE OFFICIAL HISTORIOGRAPHY OF MEXICAN INDEPENDENCE

Mexican independence has been interpreted from a variety of standpoints, reflecting both the interests of groups in power and shifting academic fashion. Heroes and villains, with some exceptions, have swapped roles, and sometimes it has been very difficult to determine who was what. After the consolidation of the Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI) in the early-twentieth century, the Liberal tradition became predominant in both Mexican political life and in the official curricula of state schools and other educational establishments. Many of the streets of Mexico City lost their traditional names, replaced by those of leaders of the PRI and its Liberal heroes. The party’s official vision of Mexican history was accepted socially during the 75 years when it was in power. However, the shift of power to a conservative, Catholic political party (Partido Acción Nacional, PAN) changed the situation, and, as a consequence, the contradictions and misunderstandings of the so-called ‘official history’ began to be challenged. This paper examines key features of these historiographical trends, with particular reference to the historiography of Independence

Palavras-chaves: Mexico, Liberal, Partido Revolucionario Institucional

Autores: Priego, Natalia (University of Liverpool, United Kingdom/Ver Königr)

atrás

University of Vienna | Dr.-Karl-Lueger-Ring 1 | 1010 Vienna | T +43 1 4277 17575